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We’re not being obscene! We just want to connect.

We’re not being obscene! We just want to connect.

Have you ever tried to do an online search for the womanly criteria we use for our gorgeous garments? Things like … Full bust? Busty petite? Bosomy? Even D or J Cup! Can you imagine what Google throws back at us when we type those into their search engine? I bet you can, and I bet you’ve likely had the same search results - pornography.

It really is shocking. And our frustrations at trying to communicate our comfort-changing, luxe (and modest) collections to our you beautifully blessed are growing.

We live in a world of imagery. Social media – particularly for fashion – highlights that. We’ve done our homework and scoured high and low including all over social media platforms, to reach women who - just like us – will love our designs. We know you’re out there – there’s three of us just in this very office!  And every day we speak to another woman who identifies with our solutions and recalls a familiar sounding story about how they have struggled to find comfortable and supportive apparel to accommodate their boob size and body shape. The problem is – social media seems to categorize our imagery (meaning busty women in general) as ‘inappropriate’.

Case in point… we recently posted an image of our silk-mesh lingerie slip in development…a little peek into our pattern room. There was no cleavage showing, no sexy pose twirling hair or with open, lusty mouth … just a mirror shot taken by me at the end of a HUGE studio day. The post was ‘liked’ by the most followers ever at that time, so we decided to Boost the post to reach Facebookers who may not identify with the Instagram platform. It was knocked back for “not meeting Facebook’s standards”!

Initial surprise gave way to shock. Then outrage. Why can bikini clad less bosomy women post and advertise semi-naked swimwear or intimate lingerie far more revealing imagery? And have it considered ‘sexy’ … but not TOO SEXY so as to be labelled “obscene”! Strangely, this feels like discrimination. Body discrimination. Why is a busty figure unpalatable for social media even when the imagery is far more sedate than the same clothing with less boob in it? This is something that comes up time and time again on Facebook. It seems like every other day there’s a breast feeding shot getting banned right under a bikini model doing her (very slightly within the Facebook-guideline, and yet very explicit) thing. And props to her! Flaunt what you have, but let there be some equality in it all.

The issue that social media instantly seems to think our mammary glands are pornographic is hugely concerning, and equally saddening. Think of the impact this is having on pre-teen girls in our societies with the endless struggle to find even a regular bra – not sexy, just practical and cute and something that makes them equal with their less endowed peers. Those dressing-room frustrations are endless when your assets are over a D-Cup and the toxicity of the “standard” clothing size range grows over your lifetime. I remember the agony, and the tears, and the alienation we felt in my own skin – all because I wanted to buy a cute bra.

Nowadays, young women find clothing online -especially busty young women who have been re-butted by the shops and their “conventional sizing” parameters. Young women follow blogs by people who show them the lifestyle they could have if only they bought this dress, they ‘like’ celebrities and all of their wonderfully endless wardrobe choices on Facebook. Then they click on the Instagram button, search a hashtag relating to their busty sizes and are inundated with pornography. It’s damaging. It’s alienating a whole subsection of women, who are trying to find others in their predicament of small waist-big bust, and constantly being bombarded with age inappropriate imagery.

So, if you know someone who, like us, grapples with their unique (and wonderful) shape and bust size but doesn’t feel like they have a community of people who understand, please put them in touch with us. We would love to hear from them, connect with them and be one of many modern day beacons against body discrimination in social media so we can all be at peace with our own exceptional shape.

From this day forward, we are going to be adding #endbodydiscrimination onto our posts, and we hope you and your bosomed buddies do the same.

Note: When we looked up this hashtag to do our homework per usual – yep – you guessed it…some a***hole even there is over-sexualizing our breasts inappropriately … but we are going to take it over!!

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